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Medieval Sourcebook:
Henry II of England:
Grant of Freedom from Wreck to Men of Lübeck, 1176


The hanse of Lübeck obtained from Henry II of England freedom from that annoying medieval right of "wreck." The importance of this lay in the fact that henceforth the merchants of Lübeck would not lose their merchandise when their ship was technically a "wreck."

It has already come to our notice that the merchants of your city, and those of other German cities, desire to frequent our kingdom with their goods.... Wherefore, we wish it to be known to you, and the merchants of the other cities of Germany, by these presents, that we wish to show grace and favor to all and each of the said merchants frequenting our shores. And on behalf of us and our children we wish to confirm all the customs and privileges which the merchants of Germany enjoyed in the time of our predecessors, the kings of England. We also desire that if it should happen that your ships should be wrecked in these parts, and from such wreck any man should escape alive and reach the

shore, all the goods and chattels contained in that ship shall remain the property of those to whom they first belonged; nor shall there be extorted from the true masters of those goods what is called

"wreck."

At Westminster, August 26th, 1176.


Source.

From: G. F. Sartorius, ed., Urkundliche Geschichte des Ursprunges der Deutschen Hanse, J. M. Lappenberg, rev. & ed., (Hamburg, 1830), Vol. II, p. 8; reprinted in Roy C. Cave & Herbert H. Coulson, eds., A Source Book for Medieval Economic History, (Milwaukee: The Bruce Publishing Co., 1936; reprint ed., New York: Biblo & Tannen, 1965), pp. 222-223.

Scanned by Jerome S. Arkenberg, Cal. State Fullerton. The text has been modernized by Prof. Arkenberg.


This text is part of the Internet Medieval Source Book. The Sourcebook is a collection of public domain and copy-permitted texts related to medieval and Byzantine history.

Unless otherwise indicated the specific electronic form of the document is copyright. Permission is granted for electronic copying, distribution in print form for educational purposes and personal use. If you do reduplicate the document, indicate the source. No permission is granted for commercial use.

© Paul Halsall, October 1998
halsall@fordham.edu

 



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© Site Concept and Design: Paul Halsall created 26 Jan 1996: latest revision 20 January 2021 [CV]